All About CSU-Pueblo

Masters Program in History

IntroductionImage of Antique Globe

The M.A. in history at CSU-Pueblo is designed in response to a demand from teachers, public historians, and members of the community to offer more opportunities for professional and individual development and growth in the field of history in the Pueblo region.  In addition to introducing new trends in interpreting history and new discoveries in the field, the program stresses new techniques and strategies for transmitting historical ideas in the classroom, in museums, and in the community.

Application Procedure

To be eligible for the CSU-Pueblo graduate program in history, students need to have a B.A. or B.S. in history or a related discipline with a minimum 3.0 undergraduate grade point average from an accredited institution of higher learning.  All applications to the graduate program must be sent to the history department directly.  The required application materials include the following:

Graduate application form
Statement of qualifications and academic research interests that demonstrates your potential for success in the program (2-3 pages)
Current CV (curriculum vita) or resume
Three academic letters of reference
Official transcripts for all prior post-secondary work
A scholarly writing sample of no more than 15 pages in length
$35 application fee

Applications are due May 1st of each year.  Depending on current enrollments, we may accept applications for spring admission, due December 1.  Submit all required materials to the history department administrative assistant, Alysse McCanna.  It is the applicant's responsibility to ensure that the appropriate party has received all materials.  The department and the Admissions Office cannot process your application until all materials have been received.

Program Requirements

The graduate program currently has one focus, a general U.S. history track.  Students have the option of either taking a written comprehensive examination or writing a master's thesis.

Coursework

History courses for graduate student enrollment only are numbered at the 500 level.  Graduate students may also take selected undergraduate courses for graduate credit (with the Graduate Director’s approval).  Those undergraduate courses must be offered by graduate faculty in history at the 400 level (a maximum of two, 400-level courses is allowed; these will count as electives).  No 300-level undergraduate courses will be accepted for credit.

Electives

21 hours total, chosen from the following courses:
HIST501: Early America to 1763 (3 hours)
HIST502: The New American Nation, 1763-1830 (3 hours)
HIST503: Civil War America, 1830-1877 (3 hours)
HIST504: U.S. History, 1877-1945 (3 hours)
HIST506: U.S. History, 1945-present (3 hours)
HIST511: Colorado History (3 hours)
HIST513: The American West (3 hours)
HIST514: The U.S. Southwest, pre-1848 (3 hours)
HIST515: The U.S. Southwest, post-1848 (3 hours)
HIST520: Slavery and Abolitionism (3 hours)
HIST521: U.S. History through Literature (3 hours)
HIST591: Special Topics (1-3 hours)

Required

HIST505: Historiography and Theory (3 hours)
HIST592: Historical Research (3 hours)
HIST510: Directed Study for Preliminary Examination (3 hours)  OR
HIST599: Thesis Research (6 hours)

Course Descriptions

HIST501: Early America to 1763 3 (3-0).
An examination of native peoples, Africans, and Europeans in the colonization and settlement of the Americas, c. 1400-1763.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor’s permission.

HIST502: The New American Nation, 1763-1830 3 (3-0).
An examination of the American Revolution, writing and ratification of the Constitution, and the political, economic, and social development of the Early Republic.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor’s permission.

HIST503: Civil War America, 1830-1877 3 (3-0).
This course will examine the coming of the sectional crisis (including slavery, western expansion, and the Mexican War), the social, economic, political, and military aspects of the Civil War, and the challenges of the Reconstruction period.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor’s permission.

HIST504: U.S. History, 1877-1945 3 (3-0).
Examination of social movements such as Populism, labor strife during the Gilded Age, Progressivism, race relations, the Red Scare, World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor’s permission.

HIST505: Historiography and Theory 3 (3-0).
This course enhances students' understanding of history by examining the strengths and limitations of historical argumentation, the practice of history, and the theoretical frameworks that historians use to understand the past.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor’s permission.

HIST506: U.S. History, 1945-present 3 (3-0).
This course will explore the social, political, and economic trends in American history since the end of World War II.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor's permission.

HIST510: Directed Study for Preliminary Examination 3 (0-0).
Directed study course with the Graduate Director in anticipation of taking the M.A. exam that semester.  This course should be taken during the student’s last semester as a graduate student.  Grade will be either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.  Repeatable.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor’s permission.

HIST511: Colorado History 3 (3-0).
An examination of the political, social, and economic factors important to the settlement and development of the Centennial State.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing or instructor's permission.

HIST513: The American West 3 (0-0).
This course will examine the settlement of the American West, the environmental history of the region, and the development of the frontier in the twentieth century.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor’s permission.

HIST514: The U.S. Southwest, pre-1848 3 (3-0).
An examination of the cultural and political development of the southwestern United States, focusing on the contributions of American Indian and Hispanic peoples in the colonial era.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor's permission.

HIST515: The U.S. Southwest, post-1848 3 (3-0).
This course will explore the cultural and political development of the southwestern United States, focusing on the contributions of American Indian and Hispanic peoples from the Mexican-American War to the present day.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor's permission.

HIST520: Slavery and Abolitionism 3 (3-0).
This course will examine the trans-Atlantic slave trade, the making of slave societies in North America, the social and religious contours of slave life, and anti-slavery movements from the colonial period to the Civil War.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor's permission.

HIST521: History through Literature 3 (3-0).
This course uses classic texts in American history, on a variety of social and political topics, to illuminate key themes in the history of the United States.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor's permission.

HIST591: Special Topics (1-3 VAR).
Topics will vary.  Repeatable.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor’s permission.

HIST592: Research 3 (0-0).
Directed independent study of a historical topic resulting in a significant research paper based on primary sources.  Prerequisite:  Graduate standing and instructor’s permission.  Repeatable.

HIST598: Internship (3-6 VAR).
Practical experience through internship with museums, archives or related organizations.  Prerequisites: Graduate standing and permission from the Graduate Director.  Grade will be either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.  Repeatable (6).

HIST599: Thesis Research 6 (0-0).
Directed study course with student’s advisor in anticipation of completing an M.A. thesis that semester.  This course should be taken during student’s last semester as a graduate student.  Grade will be either satisfactory or unsatisfactory.  Repeatable.  Prerequisite: Graduate standing and instructor’s permission.

Written Examination Option

Students taking the examination option must complete these three elements: 1) coursework, 2) the exam preparation class (HIST510), and 3) a written exam.  The comprehensive written exam will consist of questions written by three professors from whom the student took courses.  Each professor will evaluate these responses, and they will decide as a group whether the student passed or failed the exam.  Two of the three evaluators must agree to a passing grade before that student passes his or her exam.  The response to each question will be 12-20 pages long and will be open note, open book, and take home (exams are distributed over a weekend in April).  Students must be enrolled in HIST510 during the same semester they take the exam.  If a student fails the exam, he or she will be allowed to retake the exam one time in the following fall semester (for a total of two attempts).

Master's Thesis Option

Students who take the master’s thesis option will work closely with a thesis advisor to develop an original research project based on the interpretation of primary sources.  The thesis will be 80-125 pages, and may be undertaken only if the student has the written consent of a member of the graduate faculty to serve as a thesis advisor.  The thesis topic must be determined prior to the student’s enrollment in the research seminar (HIST592).  Because thesis candidates will be completing a chapter of their thesis as their research paper in HIST592, the thesis topic and name of the thesis advisor must be provided to the HIST592 instructor in writing.

Students on this track must complete these four elements: 1) coursework, 2) thesis proposal with timeline for completion, 3) thesis hours for credit (HIST599), and 4) oral thesis defense.  Students must schedule their defense and notify their committee by March 15th of the spring in which they intend to graduate; students must submit their completed manuscript to all committee members by April 1.  The defense date will be determined by the student, Graduate Director, thesis advisor, and other committee members.  The defense will be scheduled no later than April 15 (if the student intends to graduate in the spring semester).  For additional information on the university’s thesis submission requirements, see pages 79-81 of the 2011-2012 university catalog.

Funding

Students who are currently teachers in a K-12 program in southeast Colorado may be eligible for tuition remission according to the Teaching American History (TAH) grant.  This grant will also provide the required textbooks free of charge to educators.  For further information and questions about the TAH grant, contact the Graduate Director, Matt Harris.  At this point, the history program does not offer full tuition remission or other funding to students who are not covered by the TAH grant (i.e. those who are not employed as educators).  However, students who can demonstrate financial need based on their yearly FAFSA application may be eligible for funding through the university’s RAGE (Regional Access to Graduate Education) program.  This program provides a variety of resources for graduate students, including a Graduate Student Support Center.  For more information see http://www.colostate-pueblo.edu/RAGE/Pages/default.aspx.

For more information about the M.A. in History, contact:
Dr. Matthew Harris
Phone: (719) 549-2177
Email:  matt.harris@colostate-pueblo.edu